Our Mission

Circle of Hope Inc. provides emotional, financial and educational support to those diagnosed with cancer in the Santa Clarita Valley. We are dedicated to our community, serving patients and families since 2004.

100% of donations and proceeds remain in the SCV!

 Cancers We Support

Circle of Hope Inc. welcomes all members of our community that have been affected by cancer of any kind.  This includes family, friends, and those who have long-since recovered from the disease. Our education and support services are open to everyone.

Below is a list of cancers that are currently eligible for financial aid.


breast cancer ribbonBreast cancer starts in the cells of the breast as a group of cancer cells that can then invade surrounding tissues or spread (metastasize) to other areas of the body.  Breast cancer occurs when malignant tumors develop in the breast. These cells can spread by breaking away from the original tumor and entering blood vessels or lymph vessels, which branch into tissues throughout the body. When cancer cells travel to other parts of the body and begin damaging other tissues and organs, the process is called metastasis.

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cervical cancer ribbonCervical cancer was once one of the most common causes of cancer death for American women. Then, between 1955 and 1992, the cervical cancer death rate declined by almost 70%. The main reason for this change was the increased use of the Pap test. This screening procedure can find changes in the cervix before cancer develops. It can also find cervical cancer early − in its most curable stage. The death rate from cervical cancer has been stable in recent years.Cervical cancer tends to occur in midlife. Most cases are found in women younger than 50. It rarely develops in women younger than 20. Many older women do not realize that the risk of developing cervical cancer is still present as they age. More than 20% of cases of cervical cancer are found in women over 65. However these cancers rarely occur in women who have been getting regular tests to screen for cervical cancer before they were 65.

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colon cancer ribbonColon cancer is cancer that starts in either the colon or the rectum. Colon cancer and rectal cancer have many features in common. They are discussed together here.

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ovarian cancer ribbonOvarian cancer is a disease in which malignant or cancerous cells are found in the ovaries. An ovary is one of two small, almond-shaped organs located on each side of the uterus that store eggs or germ cells and produce female hormones estrogen and progesterone.

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prostate cancer ribbonProstate cancer is cancer that starts in the prostate gland. The prostate is a small, walnut-sized structure that makes up part of a man’s reproductive system. It wraps around the urethra. This is the tube that carries urine out of the body.

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testicular cancer ribbon

Testicular cancer is cancer that develops in the testicles, a part of the male reproductive system.In the United States, between 7,500 and 8,000 diagnoses of testicular cancer are made each year. It is the most common cancer in males aged 20–39 years, the period of peak incidence, and is rarely seen before the age of 15 years.

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uterine cancer ribbonEndometrial cancer, also known as womb cancer or uterine cancer, is a type of cancer that begins in the uterus (womb), specifically in the layer of cells that form the lining of the uterus, called the endometrium. Endometrial cancer can also be called cancer of the womb or cancer of the uterus. Nearly all uterine cancers are endometrial cancer. However, there is another much rarer type called uterine sarcoma, in which the malignancy starts in the muscles surrounding the womb. Endometrial cancer and uterine sarcoma are usually treated differently. Most newly-diagnosed patients are over 55 years of age.

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Melanoma occurs when the pigment-producing cells that give color to the skin become cancerous.
Symptoms might include a new, unusual growth or a change in an existing mole. Melanomas can occur anywhere on the body.
Treatment may involve surgery, radiation, medications, or in some cases chemotherapy.

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What is Cancer?

The body is made up of trillions of living cells. Normal body cells grow, divide into new cells, and die in an orderly fashion. During the early years of a person’s life, normal cells divide faster to allow the person to grow. After the person becomes an adult, most cells divide only to replace worn-out or dying cells or to repair injuries.

Cancer begins when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. There are many kinds of cancer, but they all start because of out-of-control growth of abnormal cells. Cancer cell growth is different from normal cell growth. Instead of dying, cancer cells continue to grow and form new, abnormal cells. Cancer cells can also invade (grow into) other tissues, something that normal cells cannot do. Growing out of control and invading other tissues are what makes a cell a cancer cell.

Cells become cancer cells because of damage to DNA. DNA is in every cell and directs all its actions. In a normal cell, when DNA gets damaged the cell either repairs the damage or the cell dies. In cancer cells, the damaged DNA is not repaired, but the cell doesn’t die like it should. Instead, this cell goes on making new cells that the body does not need. These new cells will all have the same damaged DNA as the first cell does. People can inherit damaged DNA, but most DNA damage is caused by mistakes that happen while the normal cell is reproducing or by something in our environment. Sometimes the cause of the DNA damage is something obvious, like cigarette smoking. But often no clear cause is found.In most cases the cancer cells form a tumor. Some cancers, like leukemia, rarely form tumors. Instead, these cancer cells involve the blood and blood-forming organs and circulate through other tissues where they grow.

Cancer cells often travel to other parts of the body, where they begin to grow and form new tumors that replace normal tissue. This process is called metastasis. It happens when the cancer cells get into the bloodstream or lymph vessels of our body. No matter where a cancer may spread, it is always named for the place where it started. For example, breast cancer that has spread to the liver is still called breast cancer, not liver cancer. Likewise, prostate cancer that has spread to the bone is metastatic prostate cancer, not bone cancer. Different types of cancer can behave very differently. For example, lung cancer and breast cancer are very different diseases. They grow at different rates and respond to different treatments. That is why people with cancer need treatment that is aimed at their particular kind of cancer.

Not all tumors are cancerous. Tumors that aren’t cancer are called benign. Benign tumors can cause problems, they can grow very large and press on healthy organs and tissues. But they cannot grow into (invade) other tissues. Because they can’t invade, they also can’t spread to other parts of the body (metastasize). These tumors are almost never life threatening.